Pages: [1]   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: The story of Mel  (Read 2175 times)
0 Members e 1 Utente non registrato stanno visualizzando questa discussione.
ɹǝǝuıƃuǝsɹǝʌǝɹ
Administrator
God of the Forum
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4.474


Più grande è la lotta, e più è glorioso il trionfo


WWW
« on: 03-04-2010, 19:07:36 »

Volevo segnalarvi una bella storiella, che vuole fare riflettere soprattutto le matricole, ma anche i già laureati, sulla bellezza della programmazione, intesa proprio come arte se vogliamo, e sul genio incompreso di alcuni programmatori ...
ma non voglio anticipare troppo, eccovi la storia, in inglese:

The story of Mel

Source: usenet: utastro!nather, May 21, 1983.
A recent article devoted to the *macho* side of programming made the bald and unvarnished statement:

Real Programmers write in Fortran.

Maybe they do now, in this decadent era of Lite beer, hand calculators and "user-friendly" software but back in the Good Old Days, when the term "software" sounded funny and Real Computers were made out of drums and vacuum tubes, Real Programmers wrote in machine code. Not Fortran. Not RATFOR. Not, even, assembly language. Machine Code. Raw, unadorned, inscrutable hexadecimal numbers. Directly.

Lest a whole new generation of programmers grow up in ignorance of this glorious past, I feel duty-bound to describe, as best I can through the generation gap, how a Real Programmer wrote code. I'll call him Mel, because that was his name.

I first met Mel when I went to work for Royal McBee Computer Corp., a now-defunct subsidiary of the typewriter company. The firm manufactured the LGP-30, a small, cheap (by the standards of the day) drum-memory computer, and had just started to manufacture the RPC-4000, a much-improved, bigger, better, faster -- drum-memory computer. Cores cost too much, and weren't here to stay, anyway. (That's why you haven't heard of the company, or the computer.)

I had been hired to write a Fortran compiler for this new marvel and Mel was my guide to its wonders. Mel didn't approve of compilers.

"If a program can't rewrite its own code," he asked, "what good is it?"

Mel had written, in hexadecimal, the most popular computer program the company owned. It ran on the LGP-30 and played blackjack with potential customers at computer shows. Its effect was always dramatic. The LGP-30 booth was packed at every show, and the IBM salesmen stood around talking to each other. Whether or not this actually sold computers was a question we never discussed.

Mel's job was to re-write the blackjack program for the RPC-4000. (Port? What does that mean?) The new computer had a one-plus-one addressing scheme, in which each machine instruction, in addition to the operation code and the address of the needed operand, had a second address that indicated where, on the revolving drum, the next instruction was located. In modern parlance, every single instruction was followed by a GO TO! Put *that* in Pascal's pipe and smoke it.

Mel loved the RPC-4000 because he could optimize his code: that is, locate instructions on the drum so that just as one finished its job, the next would be just arriving at the "read head" and available for immediate execution. There was a program to do that job, an "optimizing assembler", but Mel refused to use it.

"You never know where it's going to put things", he explained, "so you'd have to use separate constants".

It was a long time before I understood that remark. Since Mel knew the numerical value of every operation code, and assigned his own drum addresses, every instruction he wrote could also be considered a numerical constant. He could pick up an earlier "add" instruction, say, and multiply by it, if it had the right numeric value. His code was not easy for someone else to modify.

I compared Mel's hand-optimized programs with the same code massaged by the optimizing assembler program, and Mel's always ran faster. That was because the "top-down" method of program design hadn't been invented yet, and Mel wouldn't have used it anyway. He wrote the innermost parts of his program loops first, so they would get first choice of the optimum address locations on the drum. The optimizing assembler wasn't smart enough to do it that way.

Mel never wrote time-delay loops, either, even when the balky Flexowriter required a delay between output characters to work right. He just located instructions on the drum so each successive one was just *past* the read head when it was needed; the drum had to execute another complete revolution to find the next instruction. He coined an unforgettable term for this procedure. Although "optimum" is an absolute term, like "unique", it became common verbal practice to make it relative: "not quite optimum" or "less optimum" or "not very optimum". Mel called the maximum time-delay locations the "most pessimum".

After he finished the blackjack program and got it to run, ("Even the initializer is optimized", he said proudly) he got a Change Request from the sales department. The program used an elegant (optimized) random number generator to shuffle the "cards" and deal from the "deck", and some of the salesmen felt it was too fair, since sometimes the customers lost. They wanted Mel to modify the program so, at the setting of a sense switch on the console, they could change the odds and let the customer win.

Mel balked. He felt this was patently dishonest, which it was, and that it impinged on his personal integrity as a programmer, which it did, so he refused to do it. The Head Salesman talked to Mel, as did the Big Boss and, at the boss's urging, a few Fellow Programmers. Mel finally gave in and wrote the code, but he got the test backwards, and, when the sense switch was turned on, the program would cheat, winning every time. Mel was delighted with this, claiming his subconscious was uncontrollably ethical, and adamantly refused to fix it.

After Mel had left the company for greener pa$ture$, the Big Boss asked me to look at the code and see if I could find the test and reverse it. Somewhat reluctantly, I agreed to look. Tracking Mel's code was a real adventure.

I have often felt that programming is an art form, whose real value can only be appreciated by another versed in the same arcane art; there are lovely gems and brilliant coups hidden from human view and admiration, sometimes forever, by the very nature of the process. You can learn a lot about an individual just by reading through his code, even in hexadecimal. Mel was, I think, an unsung genius.

Perhaps my greatest shock came when I found an innocent loop that had no test in it. No test. *None*. Common sense said it had to be a closed loop, where the program would circle, forever, endlessly. Program control passed right through it, however, and safely out the other side. It took me two weeks to figure it out.

The RPC-4000 computer had a really modern facility called an index register. It allowed the programmer to write a program loop that used an indexed instruction inside; each time through, the number in the index register was added to the address of that instruction, so it would refer to the next datum in a series. He had only to increment the index register each time through. Mel never used it.

Instead, he would pull the instruction into a machine register, add one to its address, and store it back. He would then execute the modified instruction right from the register. The loop was written so this additional execution time was taken into account -- just as this instruction finished, the next one was right under the drum's read head, ready to go. But the loop had no test in it.

The vital clue came when I noticed the index register bit, the bit that lay between the address and the operation code in the instruction word, was turned on-- yet Mel never used the index register, leaving it zero all the time. When the light went on it nearly blinded me.

He had located the data he was working on near the top of memory -- the largest locations the instructions could address -- so, after the last datum was handled, incrementing the instruction address would make it overflow. The carry would add one to the operation code, changing it to the next one in the instruction set: a jump instruction. Sure enough, the next program instruction was in address location zero, and the program went happily on its way.

I haven't kept in touch with Mel, so I don't know if he ever gave in to the flood of change that has washed over programming techniques since those long-gone days. I like to think he didn't. In any event, I was impressed enough that I quit looking for the offending test, telling the Big Boss I couldn't find it. He didn't seem surprised.

When I left the company, the blackjack program would still cheat if you turned on the right sense switch, and I think that's how it should be. I didn't feel comfortable hacking up the code of a Real Programmer.





Sito originale (mi ero dimenticato di includerlo boh)
Mi riservo il diritto di tradurlo quando avrò un attimino di tempo anche in italiano, a beneficio di chi ancora non sa parlare questa lingua.
« Last Edit: 03-04-2010, 19:10:06 by reversengineer » Logged

La grande marcia della distruzione mentale proseguirà. Tutto verrà negato. Tutto diventerà un credo. È un atteggiamento ragionevole negare l'esistenza delle pietre sulla strada; sarà un dogma religioso affermarla. È una tesi razionale pensare di vivere tutti in un sogno; sarà un esempio di saggezza mistica affermare che siamo tutti svegli. Accenderemo fuochi per testimoniare che due più due fa quattro. Sguaineremo spade per dimostrare che le foglie sono verdi in estate. Non ci resterà quindi che difendere non solo le incredibili virtù e saggezze della vita umana, ma qualcosa di ancora più incredibile: questo immenso, impossibile universo che ci guarda dritto negli occhi. Combatteremo per i prodigi visibili come se fossero invisibili. Guarderemo l'erba e i cieli impossibili con uno strano coraggio. Saremo tra coloro che hanno visto eppure hanno creduto.

In tutto, amare e servire.

  
                            ن                           
I can deal with ads,
I can deal with buffer,
but when ads buffer
I suffer...

...nutrimi, o Signore, "con il pane delle lacrime; dammi, nelle lacrime, copiosa bevanda...

   YouTube 9GAG    anobii  S  Steam T.B.o.I. Wiki [univ] Lezioni private  ʼ  Albo d'Ateneo Unicode 3.0.1
Usa "Search" prima di aprire un post - Scrivi sempre nella sezione giusta - Non spammare - Rispetta gli altri utenti - E ricorda di seguire il Regolamento
ɹǝǝuıƃuǝsɹǝʌǝɹ
Administrator
God of the Forum
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4.474


Più grande è la lotta, e più è glorioso il trionfo


WWW
« Reply #1 on: 03-04-2010, 21:28:19 »

Avanti, era troppo bella la storia per lasciare qualcuno senza poterla leggere, quantunque magari non la capisse infine, perciò l'ho tradotta liberamente (e fedelmente al 97% boh):
Leggete numerosi, leggete! pray

La storia di Mel

Fonte: usenet: utastro!nather, 21 maggio 1983.
Un articolo recente dedicato al lato *macho* della programmazione ha emesso la seguente sentenza nuda e cruda:

I Veri Programmatori scrivono in Fortran.

Forse lo fanno oggi, in questa decadente era di birra analcolica, calcolatrici tascabili e software "user-friendly", ma ai Bei Vecchi Tempi, quando il termine "software" sembrava ridicolo e i Veri Computer erano fatti di tamburi e tubi sotto vuoto, i Veri Programmatori scrivevano in codice macchina. Non Fortran. Non RATFOR. No, nemmeno linguaggio assembly. Codice Macchina. Grezzi, disadorni, imperscrutabili numeri esadecimali. Direttamente.

Per timore che una intera nuova generazione di programmatori cresca nell'ignoranza di questo glorioso passato, mi sento obbligato a descrivere, al meglio che io possa fare superando il gap generazionale, il modo in cui un Vero Programmatore scriveva codice. Lo chiamerò Mel, perché quello era il suo nome.

Incontrai Mel quando andai a lavorare per la Royal McBee Computer Corp., una sussidiaria (ora defunta) della società di macchine da scrivere. L'azienda produsse l'LGP-30, un computer con memoria a tamburo piccolo ed economico (per gli standard del giorno), ed aveva appena iniziato a produrre l'RPC-4000, un computer con memoria a tamburo molto migliorato, più grande, migliore, più veloce. I core costavano troppo, e non ce ne stavano in giro, comunque. (Questo è il motivo per cui non hai mai sentito parlare della società, o del computer.)

Sono stato assunto per scrivere un compilatore Fortran per questa nuova meraviglia e Mel era la guida per il mio stupore. Mel non approvava i compilatori.

"Se un programma non può riscrivere il suo stesso codice," chiese, "a che serve?"

Mel ha scritto, in esadecimale, il programma per computer più famoso che la società possedesse. Funzionava sull'LGP-30 e proponeva il gioco del blackjack con potenziali clienti alle mostre di computer. Il suo effetto fu sempre drammatico. La cabina dell'LGP-30 era impacchettata ad ogni mostra, a l'uomo delle vendite IBM gironzolava parlando con tutti. Non parlammo mai del fatto che avesse venduto computer o no.

Il lavoro di Mel era riscrivere il progamma blackjack per l'RPC-4000. (Porting? Che significa?) Il nuovo computer aveva uno schema di indirizzamento uno-più-uno, in cui ogni istruzione macchina, in aggiunta al codice operazionale e l'indirizzo dell'operando necessario, aveva un secondo indirizzo che indicava dove era posizionata, sul tamburo della memoria, la successiva istruzione. In termini moderni, ogni istruzione era seguita da un GOTO! Mettete *questo* nella pipa di Pascal e fumatevelo.

Mel amava l'RPC-4000 perché poteva ottimizzare il suo codice: cioè, posizionare le istruzioni sul tamburo così che appena una finisse il suo lavoro, la prossima sarebbe arrivata alla testina di lettura e disponibile per l'esecuzione immediata. C'era un programma per fare quel lavoro, un "assemblatore ottimizzatore", ma Mel rifiutò di usarlo.

"Non sai mai dove metterà le cose", spiegò, "perciò devi usare costanti separate".

Ho impiegato molto tempo prima di capire questa osservazione. Dato che Mel conosceva il valore numerico di ogni codice operazione, e aveva assegnato da se gli indirizzi sul tamburo, ogni istruzione scritta poteva essere considerata una costante numerica. Poteva prendere una precedente istruzione "somma", diceva, e moltiplicare per essa, se avesse avuto il giusto valore numerico. Non era facile che altri riuscissero a modificare il suo codice.

Ho confrontato i programmi ottimizzati a mano di Mel con lo stesso codice processato dall'assemblatore ottimizzatore, e quello di Mel era eseguito sempre più velocemente. Questo accadeva perché la metodologia di progettazione programmi "top-down" non era ancora stata inventata, e Mel non l'avrebbe usata comunque. Scrisse le parti più interne dei cicli del suo programma per prime, così potevano avere la prima scelta fra le migliori locazioni d'indirizzamento sul tamburo. L'assemblatore ottimizzatore non era abbastanza furbo da farcela in questo modo.

Mel non scrisse mai cicli che introducessero ritardo temporale, neanche quando il Flexowriter lo richiedesse nell'output dei caratteri affinché funzionasse bene. Semplicemente posizionava le istruzioni sul tamburo così che ogni successiva fosse banalmente *già superata* rispetto alla testina di lettura, quando fosse necessario; il tamburo doveva eseguire una rivoluzione completa per trovare la successiva istruzione. Coniò l'indimenticabile termine per questa procedura. Sebbene "ottimo" sia un termine assoluto, come "unico", divenne colloquiale il renderlo relativo: "non abbastanza ottimo" o "meno ottimo" o "non molto ottimo". Mel chiamò le locazioni di massimo ritardo temporale le "più pessime".

Dopo aver finito il programma del blackjack e dopo che lo ebbe eseguito, ("Anche l'inizializzatore è ottimizzato", diceva orgogliosamente) ebbe una Richiesta di Cambiamento dal dipartimento vendite. Il programma usava un generatore di numeri casuali elegante (ottimizzato) per mischiare le "carte" e prenderle dal "mazzo", e ad alcuni venditori ciò sembrava fin troppo leale, dato che delle volte i compratori perdevano. Essi vollero che Mel modificasse il programma cosicché, all'attivazione di un interruttore sulla console, essi potessero cambiare le sorti e lasciare che il giocatore vincesse.

Mel si tirò indietro. Sentiva che questo sarebbe stato palesemente disonesto, come del resto era, e si rifiutò di farlo. Il Capo Venditori parlò a Mel, e così fece il Grande Capo e, spinti dal capo, alcuni Programmatori Soci. Mel infine si arrese e scrisse il codice, ma fece quel controllo al contrario e, quando l'interruttore fu attivato, il programma barò, vincendo sempre. Mel ne rimase piacevolmente sorpreso, dichiarando che il suo subconscio era incontrollabilmente etico, e rifiutò categoricamente di correggerlo.

Dopo che Mel lasciò la società per pa$coli più v€rdi, il Grande Capo mi chiese di dare un'occhiata al codice e vedere se potevo trovare quel controllo e invertirlo. In una certa maniera riluttante, mi decisi a cercarlo. Tracciare il codice di Mel fu una vera avventura.

Ho spesso sentito la programmazione come forma d'arte, il cui valore reale può essere apprezzato solo da altri portati per la stessa arte arcana; ci sono amabili gemme e brillanti nascosti alla vista e all'ammirazione umana, a volte per sempre, dalla stessa natura del processo. Si può imparare molto su di un individuo semplicemente leggendo il suo codice, persino in esadecimale. Mel era, penso, un genio non riconosciuto.

Forse il più grande shock lo ebbi quando trovai un ciclo innocente che non faceva controlli dentro. Nessun controllo. *Niente*. Il senso comune direbbe che doveva essere un ciclo infinito, dove un programma avrebbe ciclato, per sempre, senza fine. Il controllo del programma ci passò in mezzo, tuttavia, e uscì dall'altra parte senza problemi. Impiegai due settimane per capire come.

Il computer RPC-4000 ha una funzionalità veramente moderna chiamata "registro indice". Permetteva al programmatore di scrivere un ciclo che usasse una istruzione indicizzata al suo interno; ad ogni iterazione, il numero nel registro indice veniva sommato all'indirizzo dell'istruzione, così che la stessa si potesse riferire a un successivo dato di una serie. Si doveva solo incrementare l'indice ad ogni iterazione. Mel non l'ha mai usato.

Invece, lui avrebbe temporaneamente copiato l'istruzione in un registro macchina, aggiunto 1 al suo indirizzo, e l'avrebbe quindi rimessa al suo posto. Avrebbe poi eseguito l'istruzione modificata direttamente dal registro. Il ciclo era scritto in modo tale che il tempo d'esecuzione aggiuntivo fosse tenuto in conto -- appena questa istruzione avesse finito, la successiva sarebbe stata sotto la testina di lettura del tamburo, pronta. Ma il ciclo non faceva controlli.

L'indizio essenziale saltò fuori quando notai che il bit registro indice, il bit che si trova tra l'indirizzo e il codice operazionale nella word dell'istruzione, era impostato a 1-- Mel giammai avrebbe usato il registro indice, lasciando il bit a zero per tutto il tempo. Quando ebbi l'illuminazione su quel bit, quasi ne fui accecato.

Aveva posizionato i dati su cui lavorava vicino la parte alta della memoria -- le posizioni più grandi che le istruzioni potessero avere -- in questo modo, dopo che fosse stato manipolato l'ultimo dato, incrementare l'indirizzo dell'istruzione avrebbe provocato un overflow. Il riporto avrebbe aggiunto 1 al codice operazionale, e cambiato il suo in quello della prossima nel set d'istruzioni: una istruzione di salto. Quasi sicuramente, la prossima istruzione del programma sarebbe stata alla posizione zero, e il programma avrebbe continuato felicemente la sua esecuzione.

Non mi sono tenuto in contatto con Mel, perciò non so se si sia poi arreso al flusso di cambiamenti che stava rivoluzionando le tecniche di programmazione in quei tempi lontani. Mi piace pensare che non l'abbia fatto. Ma in ogni caso, sono stato impressionato abbastanza da smettere di cercare l'ingiurioso controllo, dicendo al Gran Capo che non ero riuscito a trovarlo. Non sembrò sorpreso.

Quando lasciai l'azienda, il programma del blackjack avrebbe ancora barato se si fosse attivato l'interruttore corretto, e penso che doveva essere così. Non mi sentivo a mio agio nell'hackerare il codice di un Vero Programmatore.
Logged

La grande marcia della distruzione mentale proseguirà. Tutto verrà negato. Tutto diventerà un credo. È un atteggiamento ragionevole negare l'esistenza delle pietre sulla strada; sarà un dogma religioso affermarla. È una tesi razionale pensare di vivere tutti in un sogno; sarà un esempio di saggezza mistica affermare che siamo tutti svegli. Accenderemo fuochi per testimoniare che due più due fa quattro. Sguaineremo spade per dimostrare che le foglie sono verdi in estate. Non ci resterà quindi che difendere non solo le incredibili virtù e saggezze della vita umana, ma qualcosa di ancora più incredibile: questo immenso, impossibile universo che ci guarda dritto negli occhi. Combatteremo per i prodigi visibili come se fossero invisibili. Guarderemo l'erba e i cieli impossibili con uno strano coraggio. Saremo tra coloro che hanno visto eppure hanno creduto.

In tutto, amare e servire.

  
                            ن                           
I can deal with ads,
I can deal with buffer,
but when ads buffer
I suffer...

...nutrimi, o Signore, "con il pane delle lacrime; dammi, nelle lacrime, copiosa bevanda...

   YouTube 9GAG    anobii  S  Steam T.B.o.I. Wiki [univ] Lezioni private  ʼ  Albo d'Ateneo Unicode 3.0.1
Usa "Search" prima di aprire un post - Scrivi sempre nella sezione giusta - Non spammare - Rispetta gli altri utenti - E ricorda di seguire il Regolamento
KingDavid
Forumista
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 788


Alla fine [...] tutta la realtà è binaria.


« Reply #2 on: 04-04-2010, 02:07:02 »

...mai dimenticarsi da dove si parte. Grande storia!  ok
Logged

Basti pensare che un ipotetico quadrato di specchi, lungo 200 chilometri per ogni lato, potrebbe produrre tutta l'energia necessaria all'intero pianeta.
(Carlo Rubbia)
TheManuz
Matricola
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 20



« Reply #3 on: 18-04-2010, 19:27:24 »

Letto e apprezzato!
Logged
Reader
Forumista
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 691


Lu vinu fa cantari e l'acqua fa allintari...


« Reply #4 on: 23-04-2010, 19:07:43 »

...mai dimenticarsi da dove si parte. Grande storia!  ok

 
Logged

Un giorno chiesero al Signore Budda cosa fosse la felicità e quale fosse la strada che conduceva ad essa.
Allora lui, guardandoli, rispose:  "Non vi è strada che conduca alla felicità: la felicità è la strada"
ɹǝǝuıƃuǝsɹǝʌǝɹ
Administrator
God of the Forum
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4.474


Più grande è la lotta, e più è glorioso il trionfo


WWW
« Reply #5 on: 28-03-2013, 04:06:28 »

A quasi 3 anni di distanza dalla sua scrittura, credo che alle nuove generazioni farà bene rileggere il contenuto di questo messaggio (innocentissimo... UP! ok).
Logged

La grande marcia della distruzione mentale proseguirà. Tutto verrà negato. Tutto diventerà un credo. È un atteggiamento ragionevole negare l'esistenza delle pietre sulla strada; sarà un dogma religioso affermarla. È una tesi razionale pensare di vivere tutti in un sogno; sarà un esempio di saggezza mistica affermare che siamo tutti svegli. Accenderemo fuochi per testimoniare che due più due fa quattro. Sguaineremo spade per dimostrare che le foglie sono verdi in estate. Non ci resterà quindi che difendere non solo le incredibili virtù e saggezze della vita umana, ma qualcosa di ancora più incredibile: questo immenso, impossibile universo che ci guarda dritto negli occhi. Combatteremo per i prodigi visibili come se fossero invisibili. Guarderemo l'erba e i cieli impossibili con uno strano coraggio. Saremo tra coloro che hanno visto eppure hanno creduto.

In tutto, amare e servire.

  
                            ن                           
I can deal with ads,
I can deal with buffer,
but when ads buffer
I suffer...

...nutrimi, o Signore, "con il pane delle lacrime; dammi, nelle lacrime, copiosa bevanda...

   YouTube 9GAG    anobii  S  Steam T.B.o.I. Wiki [univ] Lezioni private  ʼ  Albo d'Ateneo Unicode 3.0.1
Usa "Search" prima di aprire un post - Scrivi sempre nella sezione giusta - Non spammare - Rispetta gli altri utenti - E ricorda di seguire il Regolamento
LtWorf
Forumista Esperto
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1.079

Ogni cosa da me scritta è da intendersi come opinione personale e non come dato di fatto. Anche le eventuali dimostrazioni matematiche da me scritte saranno opinioni personali e quindi dovranno venire dimostrate da una terza parte di fiducia


WWW
« Reply #6 on: 29-03-2013, 16:19:52 »

E io che pensavo fosse un bug del forum che sto post fosse "latest"
Logged

There are some OO programming languages. I will create the first -_-' language.

LtWorf
LtWorf
Forumista Esperto
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1.079

Ogni cosa da me scritta è da intendersi come opinione personale e non come dato di fatto. Anche le eventuali dimostrazioni matematiche da me scritte saranno opinioni personali e quindi dovranno venire dimostrate da una terza parte di fiducia


WWW
« Reply #7 on: 29-03-2013, 16:32:34 »

Una foto dove compare Mel

http://zappa.brainiac.com/MelKaye.png
Logged

There are some OO programming languages. I will create the first -_-' language.

LtWorf
Chuck_son
Forumista Eroico
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1.583



WWW
« Reply #8 on: 29-03-2013, 18:51:03 »

Non mi sentivo a mio agio nell'hackerare il codice di un Vero Programmatore.
Logged

Aliens Exist
shiny
Forumista
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 810



WWW
« Reply #9 on: 31-03-2013, 10:55:52 »

Piccoli siamo proprio piccoli  pray
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
Print
Jump to: